Four Things You Need to Know About China’s Record Solar Installations (They Aren’t All Pretty)

We’re used to big numbers from China, but the reported 20 gigawatts or so of solar power that was installed in the first half of 2016 are worth a close look.

The figures are preliminary, but the story that they tell is clear: In the first half of the year alone China installed more solar power than any other country has ever done in total, since the dawn of solar power, except for Germany, Japan, and the U.S.

China’s first-half solar installations were larger than the cumulative total of everyone outside of the big three listed above – larger than Italy, Britain, France, and Spain, all of which for years had aggressive subsidy programs to encourage solar power.

For China, the 20 gigawatts of new solar power installed in the first half of 2016 is as much new solar capacity alone as Switzerland’s total electricity generating capacity.

Is China’s solar power infatuation a bubble that inevitably will burst? Or is something more fundamental happening in China’s electricity market, where more than 60 percent of electricity is still produced by coal?

Originally published in Forbes. Can be accessed here.

Watch Out, Coal! Dubai Announces Plans for World’s Lowest Cost Solar Plant

King Coal is taking a lot of blows recently. But at least it could usually count on being the cheapest alternative. Now even that’s called into question.

The latest battering to coal’s standing came when Dubai announced June 27 that it would build a massive 800-megawatt solar plant that will produce electricity at an average cost of 2.99 cents a kilowatt hour, substantially below what even coal-fired power plants charge.

This rock-bottom price offered by the developers doesn’t benefit from any obvious subsidies and is the lowest price offered by any solar plant in the world.Bloomberg reports that the price is a full 50% below the price a Saudi firm bid just 18 months ago in the same solar park in Dubai – a price that at the time was a record low, but has since been eclipsed by ever-lower prices.

That price of less than 3 cents a kilowatt hour is one-third cheaper than a coal plant also being built in Dubai, one that, like the just-announced solar facility, is also expected to start operations in 2020.

Originally published in Forbes. Can be accessed here.

Review: China Fast Forward by Bill Dodson

Dodson’s book is a bit like China itself: fast-moving, somewhat kaleidoscopic, hard to pin down, by turns baffling, frustrating and entertaining. Reading the book is a bit like watching a movie running at twice or four times its normal speed—it is sometimes a bit jerky, but fast-paced and often entertaining.

Despite writing a book filled with often searing criticism, Dodson dearly hopes that China will somehow pull it off… yet despairs that it won’t. This is a rapidly-paced, even scattershot book, more of a quick tour than an in-depth visit. For anyone familiar with China, most of these arguments will not be new. For anyone who knows less about China or who thinks that China’s rise is unstoppable, there is much here to recommend.

This review was originally published in the Asian Review of Books. Can be accessed here